If You Can’t Stand the Heat…or the Cold…Then Get to the Dentist!

Mar 2, 2017 @ 10:00 AM — by Steven Balloch, DDS

A woman clutching her jaw in discomfort due to tooth sensitivity to hot and cold temperaturesIf you experience tooth sensitivity to hot and cold temperatures, you might already be depriving yourself of some of life’s greatest pleasures, whether it’s that first sip of a cold drink after a long day or a spoonful of your favorite soup, piping hot, on a chilly evening. Maybe you believe that such tooth sensitivity is something that comes with age, or that it is just an unfortunate change that has occurred in your mouth. If so, here is some good news: most tooth sensitivity to hot and cold can be traced to an oral health problem and therefore can be corrected through advanced restorative dentistry.

You don’t have to live with tooth sensitivity to hot and cold any longer. At the Hartford, CT restorative, cosmetic, and general dentistry practice of Steven M. Balloch, D.D.S., Dr. Balloch can identify the cause of your tooth sensitivity and then recommend a treatment plan to resolve the issue. You will emerge from treatment with improved oral health, a restored ability to tolerate hot and cold temperatures, and an overall better quality of life.

If you are tired of experiencing tooth sensitivity to hot and cold temperatures, we urge you to schedule your initial consultation with Dr. Steven M. Balloch today.

What Causes Tooth Sensitivity to Hot and Cold Temperatures?

There are several reasons that a person’s teeth can start to become sensitive to extreme temperatures. Diagnosing the underlying cause of tooth sensitivity to hot and cold temperatures is essential to providing the proper treatment.

The most common causes of tooth sensitivity to hot and cold include:

  • Worn enamel: Enamel is the outermost layer of the tooth, which protects the underlying layer of dentin from being exposed to bacteria and other undesirable elements. Dentin contains microscopic tubes that allow heat and cold to stimulate the nerves within the tooth, which causes tooth sensitivity.
  • Periodontal disease: Periodontitis, the advanced stage of periodontal disease, causes the gum tissues to pull away from the teeth. As a result, the cementum that protects the dentin below the gum line can start to erode, once again allowing hot and cold to reach the nerves of the tooth via microscopic tubes.
  • Root canal infections: Sensitivity to hot and cold can also be a sign of a root canal infection. When the dental pulp inside of the root canal of a tooth becomes infected, the tooth can become highly sensitive to extreme temperatures, in which case the only resolution is root canal therapy.
  • Chips and cracks: Chips and cracks in the tooth can expose the microscopic tubes in the dentin, leading to tooth sensitivity to hot and cold temperatures.

Learn More about Tooth Sensitivity to Hot and Cold

If you are struggling with tooth sensitivity to hot and cold temperatures, and you would like to learn more about how we can help to resolve your issues, please schedule your initial consultation with Dr. Steven M. Balloch by contacting our cosmetic, restorative, and general dentistry practice today.

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